AquaSan’s Story

AquaSan was incorporated in 1983 as a water management and development consulting firm specializing in water and sanitation issues in the Denver Metropolitan area.  As former employees of the Denver Water Board, AquaSan assisted developers and district’s in their relationship, tap fees, and costs associated with Denver, the Two Forks project, and water management.   AquaSan branched out to develop water projects in Colorado including helping the U. S. Forest service develop in-stream water rights, City of Lakewood and Cherry Creek Valley Water District develop its ground and surface water rights and various developers including Walters Companies, Alpert Development, Signet Partners, and JPI.  From its development experience AquaSan had several principals recognized in Federal and State Courts as water experts.

After the demise of Two Forks the cost of water and impact fees rose significantly and it became evident that improved water management could both develop water and reduce developer costs.   AquaSan expanded its business to include the development of water management strategies that reduced water and sewer costs and impact fees and resulted in writing Colorado’s Model Water Conservation plan, and numerous city and district water management plans including Englewood, Lakewood, and Cherry Creek Valley.  Water management and the use computers to accurately track the use of water in businesses, hotels, and residents led to Mr. Iadarola becoming a principal author of the rewrite of the American Water Works Association’s M-22 Manuel on the sizing of water taps and speaker at numerous regional and national professional conferences.

Mr. Iadarola’s interest in history led him to embark on forming the Colorado Water Education Foundation (“CWEF”) and becoming its first President.  The Foundation included private, non-profit and public entities coming together to provide the public with a better understanding and appreciation of water.  The CWEF developed the first Colorado Water Map and Colorado Water History Map under his leadership.  

As AquaSan’s reputation grew for economic development of water it was hired by several power companies including Southern, Enron, Williams and KN energy to acquire water for its thermal energy plants around the U. S..  These plants generally require about 1500 AFY.  After successfully identifying and developing the water well within the specified allowance, AquaSan was approached about developing power plants, with the argument, “that if you can develop the water, which is always the hardest part of any project, you can use the same expertise to develop the power plants”.  

As a result, AquaSan was hired by Williams & Kinder Morgan to develop 500 mW power plant within three years.   AquaSan fully developed and had “shovel ready” within 12 months, 1500 mW of thermal plants.   This led to another stint of developing thermal plants for Invenergy, which resulted in two thermal plants totaling 850 mW of power being fully developed in 22 months.   Fully developed being all land use, environmental, air, water, wastewater, storm water, and federal permits acquired.  The combined cycle plant was the only thermal powered power plant in the U. S. approved without “scrubbers”.  

Progressing past gas-fired power plants, which at the time was considered “clean energy” AquaSan was then hired to pursue the development of wind energy.   Principals in AquaSan developed 1300 mW of wind energy in Oregon and Washington and co-developed 800 mW of wind energy in California and Colorado.

After the wind energy opportunity, AquaSan principals joined with several principals from other firms to form SolarGen USA.   AquaSan principals were responsible for the development aspect of a project and successfully developed a pipeline of over 700 mW in California.  Approximately 200 Mw of fully developed solar projects in two years.  

AquaSan’s work in California attracted the attention of Mayor Edward Hagedorn, in Puerto Princesa, Philippines.   Mayor Hagedorn is  recognized by the United Nations and other international organizations as a leading proponent of environmental issues.  Mr. Hagedorn invited Mr. Iadarola to develop a solar / hybrid electrical system and water system for one of the New Seven Natural Wonders of the world, the Underground River.  The project is presently being developed. 

AquaSan continues to be active in development of water projects the including water management programs for developers and buildings and the permitting of wells, reservoirs, and recharge programs and a frequent speaker for water, energy, environmental and building groups.  Mr. Iadarola continues to teach Environmental Policy and Sustainability at the University of Colorado Graduate School of Political Science.